Postcards from Italy
THE BLOG OF CIU TRAVEL

The “Mountain of Fire”: Mount Etna

Mount Vesuvius may be Italy's most famous volcano, its place in the annals of history guaranteed with the destruction—and, more importantly, preservation—of the Roman town of Pompeii in 79 A.D. Vesuvius looms over one of the most densely populated stretches of coastline near Naples, and is generally viewed as a benign giant, quietly venting steam and smoke and ultimately fated to erupt again. The King of the Bay of Naples is your neighbor who keeps a friendly but unpredictable watch dog chained in his yard.

mt-etna-cr-ciutravel(Photo by CIU Travel via Flickr)

Mount Etna, on the other hand, is your neighbor who has a pack of snarling, howling beasts roaming the streets, terrorizing the neighborhood and posing a constant threat of death and destruction. This lively volcano on the east coast of Sicily between the cities of Catania and Messina is the largest in Europe, and one of the most active in the world, a hulking yet dramatically beautiful mountain in a constant state of eruption. From belches of gas, bursts of steam, to full-on lava flows, Etna makes no bones about its danger to the millions of residents who live at its foot and the thousands of tourists who visit the hissing craters at its summit each year.

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Loving Italy to Death: Tips for Sustainable Travel

As news of popular destinations in Italy like Capri, the Cinque Terre, and Venice becoming so besieged by travelers that residents are exasperated with the crowds and local administrations are considering measures to limit the number of visitors, many Italophiles are asking themselves if they should cut those locations from their itineraries altogether.

guggenheim-venezia-cr-ciu-travel(Photo by CIU Travel via Flickr)

The answer, of course, is no: these and many other hot spots across Italy have economies driven mainly by tourism, and a precipitous drop would have negative effect for everyone from local hoteliers to the plumbers who keep their faucets from dripping. Instead, it's important to be the right kind of tourist, one who bolsters both the economy and the culture of a destination and helps locals continue to welcome visitors from across the globe with the warm hospitality for which Italy is known.

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